s2Member®

No Banner to display

Log In

Find me

Follow englishwithjo on Twitter

Subscribe to me on YouTube

Recommended Books

Posts Tagged ‘expression’

Phrasal Verb – Crowd Around

Wednesday, August 1, 2012 @ 08:08 AM
posted by Jo

Crowd Around

The phrasal verb ‘crowd around’ describes when people surround someone or something, especially because they want to see what is happening.

People usually ‘crowd around’ when someone has been injured, if there is something interesting or exciting to see, or if they are trying to hear someone speak.

Here are some example sentences:

The children were crowding around the small mouse, trying to see whether it was still alive or not.

The followers crowded around their leader to hear him speak.

The noun ‘crowd’ is a group of people who have gathered together to do something.

Phrasal Verb – Stay Away

Wednesday, July 25, 2012 @ 01:07 PM
posted by Jo

Stay Away

The phrasal verb ‘stay away’ means to not go to a place, usually because it is harmful or dangerous.

We often use this phrasal verb with the preposition ‘from’.

Example: Stay away from that beach, I have heard there are sharks there.

We also use ‘stay away’ to say not to spend time with a particular person.

Example: Stay away from the new boy in school, he’s trouble.

The phrasal verb ‘stay away’ can be shouted as a warning to somebody to not come any closer.

Example: Stay away! If you come any closer I will call the police.

English Conversation – Royal Families

Tuesday, July 24, 2012 @ 07:07 PM
posted by Jo

Royal Families

This is the preparation material for an English conversation lesson about Monarchies and Royal Families.

A monarchy is a kind of government where a monarch, a kind of hereditary ruler is the head of state. Monarchs usually rule until they die or resign (when a monarch resigns it is called abdication). Most monarchies are hereditary, but some are elected. Some common titles for monarchs are King, Queen, Emperor, Empress, Czar, Kaiser, Shah, Emir and Sultan.  One of the most famous Monarchs is Queen Elizabeth II.

 

read more

English Conversation – Honesty & Lies

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 @ 01:05 PM
posted by Jo

Honesty and Lies

This is an English preparation lesson about honesty, lies and deception.

Most people tell white lies, small untruths that help to save trouble or avoid upsetting someone. How often do we tell white lies? It depends in part on our age, education, and even where we live. According to one study, honesty increases as we get older. While most people use little white lies to make life easier, the majority of people care about honesty in both public and personal life. They believe that ‘honesty is the best policy’.

read more

English Idiom of the Day – To Get Caught Red-Handed

Monday, April 2, 2012 @ 08:04 AM
posted by Jo

To Get Caught Red Handed

A person who is caught red-handed is discovered in the middle of committing a crime or doing something wrong. It is usually related to stealing but can also be used by a parent who finds their child eating their way through a box of chocolates.

Example: He tried to steal from the shop but he was caught red-handed.

Did you know…? This idiom originated in the 14th century when the act of killing another man’s animal and selling the meat was a common crime. If a person was caught with the blood of a freshly killed animal on their hands this was considered proof of their guilt.

English Idiom of the Day – Money Doesn’t Grow on Trees

Wednesday, March 28, 2012 @ 08:03 AM
posted by Jo

Money Doesn’t Grow on Trees

The expression ‘money doesn’t grow on trees’ means that money does not come easily or without effort; you should be careful how much money you spend because there is only a limited amount.

Example: ‘Dad, can I have a new bike?’ ‘We can’t afford one. Money doesn’t grow on trees you know.’

When Tony was younger, his father told him that money doesn’t grow on trees, and that he would have to work hard if he wanted to be rich.’

Did you know…?  There is a Japanese proverb that states that, contrary to the above idiom, money can grow on trees. The proverb states: Money grows on the tree of persistence. In other words, if you keep trying and never give up, money will come to you.

English Idiom of the Day – Lump Sum

Tuesday, March 27, 2012 @ 09:03 AM
posted by Jo

Lump Sum

A ‘lump sum’ is a large amount of money you pay or receive all at once rather than in increments over a period of time.

Examples: You will receive a tax-free lump sum of $50,000 at retirement age.

Would you like to repay the amount in installments or as one lump sum?

Did you know…? The origin of the phrase ‘lump sum’ comes from one of the meanings of the word ‘lump’, which is: ‘not broken or divided into parts’.  If we ‘lump’ people together, it means we put them together in a single group.

English Idiom – Have your cake and eat it too!

Monday, March 19, 2012 @ 09:03 AM
posted by Jo

To have your cake and eat it too

If someone wants to ‘have their cake and eat it too’, they want everything their way. It sometimes suggests that someone is not willing to compromise even when conflicts exist.

Examples: I worked at home so I could raise my family and still earn money. It let me have my cake and eat it too.

This idiom is often used in the negative: ‘you can’t have your cake and eat it too’

Example: If you want a senior consultant to work here, you must pay the salary she demands. You cannot have your cake and eat it too.

Similar idiom: An idiom with a similar meaning is: ’You can’t have it both ways’.